0 In Painted Paper/ Tempera Paint

How To Make Painted Papers: VOL 2.

I have been asked by many followers to create a tutorial video of how I create painted paper with my students. I also had a follower ask me some great questions about the process, so I thought I would share those questions and the video.
 

How do I organize creating painted paper so that I will have the right colors and amount of paper that I need? 
 
I basically have the kids paint the paper in a rainbow of colors. Here is where it gets tricky. If you don’t have a drying rack you will want to paint paper in small doses. Like maybe 25 sheets a day. 
I have a huge drying rack so I can have different classes make the different colors all in one day. For example a class of 25 kiddos can each paint 2-3 papers. So that is at least 50 pieces of 12 x 18 of one shade of painted paper. By the end of the day I have at least 250 sheets of various painted papers.
What is your strategy for deciding which paint color combinations, and on what color of paper?  Think COLOR WHEEL  / RAINBOW ! 🙂
SUPPLIES NEEDED
PLACEMATS
Have them grab a placemat~ a piece of  18 x 24 tagboard. Yes it can get a little messy so I like to protect the work surface.
PAINTBRUSHES
CONSTRUCTION PAPER
I use TRU Ray 12 x 18 construction paper as it is the best to hold the paint.
TEMPERA PAINTS
 I use Blick’s premium tempera paint.
I start with my first class of the day.
Students will use yellow, white and a pinch of peach or orange premium tempera paint poured into small piles on a plate. Kids will grab a sheet of yellow construction paper, and use big round bristle brushes. I demonstrate how to tap into the paint, not scoop,  then hop the brush all around on a piece of yellow construction paper. Using the colored construction paper helps add an additional color.
 
Also stress not to load up the paper with paint. Puddles of tempera paint just make a mess. If they have puddles have them dip their brushes into the paint and move that paint around.
After I see every student has created at least one painted paper, I then walk around and add a little more orange tempera paint. Now there is more orange than yellow in the paint trays. The goal of this is to start mixing new tints and shades on the paper. If you need to add more yellow or white, the kids will let you know! lol  
I describe myself as a waitress filling up the plates of paint like a waitress refills their drinks at a restaurant. Why, you would never yell in a restaurant FILL MY DRINK!  We talk about patience and manners and to raise your hand if you need more paint, never to yell. It works wonders! 
Then the 2nd class comes in. The color of tempera paint that they would start with is orange, magenta, and white. The construction paper color would be peach or a pink, then maybe orange. Once they are done with their first round of papers they start adding red tempera paint from the plate. Remember, you will have to walk around and refill those little plates.
The 3rd class would do the same process with red, hot pink, and white paint with pink construction paper, adding a little purple paint to the mix for the second round of painted papers. 
The 4th class would use tempera paints in purple and white with light purple construction paper, adding a little blue tempera paint to the mix for their second round of painted paper.
The 5th class of your day would be all the blues and turquoises with light blue construction paper.  
If you don’t have the space to dry these painted papers you could have just one class create them. Each table would be a different color with its analogous color in the plate. I use a color wheel poster for this process and explain what colors to use. Adding white creates a TINT, and a darker color added to the base color creates a shade.
My students LOVE making these papers! They know they do not get their paper back because it goes into a community pile. They are all about the PROCESS! 🙂
 
Do you consider individual projects and then calculate the numbers for certain colors of painted paper? 
 
Sometimes. For example: If I am making little cabins for a grade level I will make sure I have enough to cover that group. Also, I cut down the papers. Most of the time a project would require 6 x 9 inch painted paper so basically one 12 x18 painted sheet would serve 4 kiddos.
I store the papers in piles of colors. I have a blog post that shows the tools and storage system of my painted papers. http://www.paintedpaperart.com/2016/01/painted-papers-101/
I hope this helps! Using painted papers just really changes a simple project into such a rich and colorful artwork. If you need any more questions please feel free to ask! 
HaVe FuN PaInTiNg!
Laura xoxo 

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